10 New Dog Tips

new dog

There is no better way to increase your family’s energy, enthusiasm and loyalty than to adopt a new dog. Once you’ve found your new furry family member, there are several steps you can take to make sure they feel right at home from day one. Here are some handy tips to make the new transition as seamless and stress-free as possible.

 

  • Ahead of Time
    • Create some vocabulary.
      • Make sure your list is simple and distributed to all household members. This ensure everyone is providing consistent training to your new pooch.
    • Have an ID tag ready when you pick up your dog.
      • Tag should include contact information, in case your dog accidentally gets loose.
    • Dog-proof your house!
      • Cover exposed electrical wires with tape, secure cabinets, etc.

 

  • Arrival and Beyond
    • The first place your dog should visit is the bathroom.
      • Take your dog straight from the car to this area.
      • Wait for them to relieve themselves before moving inside.
    • Consider setting your new dog up in a room with a tiled floor for the first day or so.
      • With all of the excitement, your new dog may be nervous and temporarily forget some of its house training skills.
    • If crate training, introduce your dog to the crate right away.
    • Make sure that everyone in your family understands how best to approach a new dog.
      • Always let your new dog approach you first. If they aren’t ready, respect this and try again later.
      • Turn your body slightly to the side and do not look at the dog directly.
      • Hold your hand out to them so if they can sniff, if they choose.
      • Only when the dog approaches, pat their neck, side, back or chest.
      • Do not reach overhead, as this might be frightening for a new animal.
    • For the first week or so, replicate your new dog’s shelter feeding schedule and brand of food.
      • If changing their food, mix current and new food together, increasing the new food ratio over time.
    • Implement a consistent routine of feeding, play time, walks, and alone time.
      • Ensure solitary time is just that – provide toys or bones, but don’t respond to calls for attention.
    • For the first few days, remain calm and quiet around your dog.
      • Get to know their communication style as they grow safe feelings towards you.

It commonly takes a few weeks to know your dog’s true personality. Predictability and routine will have your dog warming up to you, and feeling at home, in no time. Haven’t found your new dog yet? Check out our adoptable dogs¬†list regularly!

 

 

 

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